Small Business Attorney

Have you ever wondered about what a small business attorney is? Well, if you have, then welcome! A small business attorney is a person that went through years of schooling to get his or her degree in business to be able to learn and grow as a businessperson.

Small business attorneys have all sorts of duties. They find information about how to start a corporation, partnership, or sole proprietorship, franchises, general business law, and taxation. They can study their processes and regulations in order to assist people in a more explainable manner. Small business attorneys give individuals the tools and advice in order to help their business grow. With that being said, if you want to start your own business, think about creating a partnership. When creating a partnership a person can find the assistance they need from a small business attorney and the attorney can help out with the important filings that you need for a small business.

There are of course other orders that have to be met by the state of California in order for businesses to be accepted. Among them are that corporations and companies file a form called a “statement of information”. Your small business attorney can help you out by explaining to you which forms you need to use in order to file your papers. The attorney may also tell you that you can fill out the papers at the secretary’s main website.

Small business lawyers concentrate on many factors that have to do with businesses. They know about sole proprietorships, partnerships, LLC’S, corporations, nonprofit corporations, business contracts, hiring workers, and risk management for your business. Small business attorneys deal with and cover many of these situations no matter what type of company it is.

A small business is considered small based on certain standards that have to do with various industries in relation to the state of the economy. The laws and the rules that your business has to follow depend on each state, the legal formation of your business, and the nature of the product and service your company offers to people. Since the laws change year after year, there is no way of keeping a checklist as it may have old laws and regulations from the past.

That is why if you are planning on starting a small business of your own it is best if you obtain a small business lawyer in order to have a clear sense and not fall into any serious business trouble that you may have if you do it on your own. A small business lawyer does not only give you advice and counsel about the laws that have to do with owning a small business but they also represent you when any legal problems occur.

You have probably heard, in the past, about the many different types of insurance that exist today. But have you ever heard of a process called insurance claims? An insurance claim is a request made to an insurance company. It can be any type of insurance but, mainly, it is a person asking for payment based on the regulations of the insurance policy. In other words, insurance claims are then reviewed by the company for their acceptance and then once that is finished it is finally paid to the insured or the requestor.

Insurance can cover everything from death benefits on life insurance policies to routine health tests for your well being at your local doctor. On the other hand, claims are filed by third parties for the insured person. There are many types of insurance available, for example, health insurance, disability, auto, life, home, and car accident.

The main function of business law is to cover all laws that govern any business and commercial transactions. It is also thought of as being a civil law that revolves around both private law and public law. Within business law there is something called commercial law, which has two elements; a principal and an agent. This mainly has to do with things like carriage by land and sea, merchant shipping, fire, life, insurance accident, bills of exchange and partnership.

Other countries have made their own civil codes that communicate statements of their own commercial law. In the United States, commercial law is part of the United States Congress and its power to control interstate commerce. A lot has been taken care of in order to better the unity of commercial law in the United States.

 

The Four Stages of ‘Change Curve’ Small Business Owners Should Know

The ‘Change Curve’ is a helpful tool for small businesses to understand the stages of personal transition each employee undergoes. Kubler Ross developed this model to explain the grieving process (Shock and Denial, Anger and Fear, Acceptance and Commitment).

This model helps small business owners predict how employees will react to a change, and advises how to help and support the employees through their personal transitions.

An organization does not change just because of new systems or processes. It changes because people within the organization adapt and change. Only when people within the organization make their own personal transitions can the organization benefit from the change.

The Change Curve model

The ‘Change Curve’ model helps small business owners understand the stages of personal transition and organization change. This model comprises four stages that employees go through as they adjust to a change.

Stage – 1: Shock and denial

Stage – 2: Anger and fear

Stage – 3: Acceptance

Stage – 4: Commitment

Stage – 1: Shock and denial

This is the first reaction that small business owners notice in their employees – they react to the challenges to the status quo. This reaction is seen more in experienced and established employees because these employees are indifferent to new systems and procedures. They feel uncomfortable because of the fear of the unknown, fear of doing something wrong and lack of information. They feel threatened and fear failure. Under these circumstances, they normally take it as a friction rather than an opportunity.

What do the employees need here?

Employees may experience this stage multiple times. To get over it, employees need information, need to understand what is happening in the organization and need to know how to get help from the organization.

Note: This stage affects particularly those employees who have not experienced any major change before.

What should the organization do?

At this stage, it is the responsibility of the owners to communicate with their employees and educate them about the benefits that they will gain by adapting to new systems – personally and professionally. Remember not to overwhelm your employees by flooding them with loads of information at a time, or they may even be more confused.

Stage – 2: Anger and fear

This is the second stage that is seen in the employees. As employees react to a change, they start expressing their anger, concern, resentment or fear. They may resist the change actively or passively. This stage could be dangerous and if the organization does not manage it carefully, it might result in chaos.

What should the organization do?

At this stage, the small business owner should handle employees’ objections carefully. Since reaction to change is personal and emotional, it’s impossible to prevent it from happening. Therefore, the organization should try to address the employees’ experience and iron out the issues as early as possible.

Note: As long as employees remain at Stage – 2 of the Change Curve by escaping progress, the change will be unsuccessful.

Stage – 3: Acceptance

This is a turning point for employees as well as the organization because the employees have stopped focusing on what they have lost and have started accepting changes. They begin exploring changes, and get a real idea of what’s good and what’s not and how to adjust themselves accordingly.

What should the organization do?

This stage is critical – it takes time for employees to learn and accept things. Therefore, don’t expect your employees to be 100% productive during this stage. Give them time so that they learn and explore without much pressure.

Stage – 4: Commitment

At this stage, there will be a commitment from the employees in analyzing and embracing the change. They start rebuilding the way they work and this is the stage at which the organization starts to see the benefits of the change.

Benefits of the change

At this stage the organization will see the benefits of putting in effort for the welfare of their employees when they were in a grieving stage. The positive effects of the Change Curve are now more evident through its productivity and profit.

The Change Curve is an effective model for small business owners while managing employees. Locating an employee on the change curve will help the business owner decide on how to effectively communicate information to employees and to know what kind of support they require. This helps them take necessary measures and protect both the business and the employees.

 

How to Build and Maintain a Powerful E-mail Marketing List for Your Small Business

Everyone has an e-mail address. In the ever-changing world of technology, e-mail appears to be the easiest form of communication. Offering the most convenient form of staying in touch with friends and family, e-mail is also the primary way for your small business to maintain a steady list of loyal customers.

Standard postal mail is a product of the past that most consumers view as another weight that belongs in the trashcan, and telephone calls can feel invasive. Because of this, building a long-term e-mail list for your small business is one of the best ways to ensure your success.

The first obvious step is having an easy way for potential clients and customers to subscribe to your e-mail list. A large bold “SIGN UP FOR OUR E-MAIL LIST!” should be one of the most prominent features on your website. Include information that e-mail list members will be the recipients of special information and discounts. Few people turn down the opportunity to save money. If your business also runs a store, include an e-mail sign-up at the cash register. If they are already buying, chances are they will want to continue.

A poll conducted by Harris Interactive recently showed that the “majority of adults welcome marketing e-mails from familiar sources.” The survey polled 2,541 adults over the age of 18 and found that 74% found e-mail communications from companies they do business with to be valuable.

“Savvy consumers have come to rely on e-mail marketing communications as a resource to help them get the best deals possible,” said Kevin Johnson, president of Acxiom Digital, adding, “This poll demonstrates that e-mail marketing has evolved over the years to bring more value to consumers while proving to be a more effective medium for retailers than ever before.”

Ok, so building is easy. Maintaining is the hard part. This is where so many businesses, both big and small, lose control of their customers. An e-mail update every three days is not necessary. Customers do not want to receive a barrage of messages about information that does not matter to them. Rather than clog their inboxes, consider a weekly or bi-monthly coupon offering. Customers will appreciate the opportunity to save money without having to read useless information each day. Be sure to keep these e-mails short. A reader’s time is just as valuable as yours, and he or she does not want to read six paragraphs of fluff.

In the Harris Interactive poll mentioned earlier, 60% of those respondents who had received marketing e-mail cited substantial offers and discounts as motivation to respond, and 55% said that e-mails that were personalized to their interests and lifestyle were important to them.

Depending on the type of business you run, an e-newsletter may be a great tool to use to keep your long-term e-mail list. Send a monthly update that includes any new successes, product releases or changes in your company. Always remember your audience, too. Writing for e-mail subscribers is a much different task than writing press releases or technical business information. Keep the writing conversational and fun.

In your e-mail signup, give customers a chance to include their birthdays. Customers who receive birthday messages or special offerings for their personal holidays are likely to remain avid readers of your business newsletter. Think of your small business e-mail list as a list of friends – the closer you become, the better your business.

Do NOT add e-mail addresses without the request of the recipient. This is an automatic way to get identified as a spammer and lose credibility in the on-line world. The last thing you want for your small business is to end up in the junk e-mail category.

With an understanding of what readers want from e-mail updates, your business can keep a long list of devoted customers who appreciate your efforts to give them relevant and valuable information. As your long-term e-mail list continues to expand, you can enjoy watching your business grow, too.